What Are The Pros and Cons of Running a Wider Wheel?

What Are The Pros and Cons of Running a Wider Wheel?


 When properly matched, wider wheels with wider tires means there’s more rubber on the road for increased traction. Following this school of thought, there’s a reason that cars competing at the drag strips use super-wide racing slicks – they grip the road and get moving instead of spinning out. Wider tires perform better on skidpad tests – generating more cornering g-forces than skinny tires. And when it comes to stopping distances, wider tires can usually always scrub off speed faster without drama.


 Wheels with larger width can weigh more, creating disadvantages discussed in Section 1 of this article. Wider tires fitted to such wheels are also more susceptible to following ruts in the road – pulling you from one side to another if you’re not paying attention. Wider tires do not cut a path in wet or snowy conditions as well as narrower tires, and are more likely to aquaplane and lose grip in heavy rain conditions. They have a higher rolling resistance, which means the engine must work harder to move more rubber over the road. When that happens, fuel economy suffers.