What Are The Disadvantages of Plus-Sizing?

What Are The Disadvantages of Plus-Sizing? 


Lower-profile tires come with some disadvantages. Primarily, their shorter sidewalls provide less cushioning. This leads to a harsh and stiff ride over bad roads, and it puts tires more at risk to damage over potholes that otherwise wouldn’t be an issue. After a hard hit, a visible blister bubble may form in the sidewall if it becomes compromised internally - or the tire may blow out completely.


Reduced tire cushioning can also take its toll on alloy wheels, which are subject to becoming bent along their edges as they slam over deep potholes. This creates an out-of-round condition that must be repaired to avoid a shimmy. In worst-case scenarios, the wheel may even crack if the impact is severe enough.


Larger wheels tend to weigh more, which comes with a number of disadvantages. If you’re going up many wheel sizes, be prepared for the effects of increased rotational mass. For example, more horsepower is required to accelerate a heavier rotating mass than a lighter one. Fuel economy can suffer.


Likewise, more braking power is required for deceleration. Increased overall weight below the suspension level (unsprung weight) creates more inertia in the springs and shock absorbers and reduces their responsiveness. Heavy wheels and tires can also make the steering feel more sluggish.